Articles

  • As Mozilla’s Web Extensions project is getting closer towards being usable, quite a few people seem to expect some variant of Chrome’s permission prompt to be implemented in Firefox. So instead of just asking you whether you want to trust an add-on Firefox should list exactly what kind of permissions an add-on needs. So users will be able to make an informed decision and Mozilla will be able to skip the review for add-ons that don’t request any “dangerous” permissions. What could possibly be wrong with that?

    In fact, lots of things. People seem to think that Chrome’s permission prompt is working well, because… well, it’s Google and they tend to do things right? However, having dealt with the effects of this prompt for several years I’m fairly certain that it doesn’t have the desired effect. In fact, the issues are so severe that I consider it security theater. Here is why.

    Posted , Author

  • My Easy Passwords extension is quickly climbing up in popularity, right now it already ranks 9th in my list of password generators (yay!). In other words, it already has 80 users (well, that was anticlimatic). At least, looking at this list I realized that I missed one threat scenario in my security analysis of these extensions, and that I probably rated UniquePasswordBuilder too high.

    Posted , Author

  • Easy Passwords is based on the Add-on SDK and runs in Firefox. However, people need access to their passwords in all kinds of environments, so I created an online version of the password generator. The next step was porting Easy Passwords to Chrome and Opera. And while at it, I wanted to see whether that port will work in Firefox via Web Extensions. After all, eventually the switch to Web Extensions will have to be done.

    Posted , Author

  • When I started writing my very own password generation extension I didn’t know much about the security aspects. In theory, any hash function should do in order to derive the password because hash functions cannot be reversed, right? Then I started reading and discovered that one is supposed to use PBKDF2. And not just that, you had to use a large number of iterations. But why?

    Posted , Author

  • “The password system is broken” – I don’t know how often I’ve heard that phrase already. Yes, passwords suck. Nobody can be expected to remember passwords for dozens of websites. Websites enforcing arbitrary complexity rules (“between 5 and 7 characters, containing at least two-upper case letters and a dog’s name”) doesn’t make it any better. So far I’ve heard of three common strategies to deal with passwords: write them down, use the same one everywhere or just hit “forgot password” every time you access the website. None of these are particularly secure or recommendable, and IMHO neither are the suggestions to derive passwords via more or less complicated manual algorithms.

    As none of the password killing solutions gained significant traction so far, password managers still seem to be the best choice for now. However, these often have the disadvantage of relying on a third-party service which you have to trust or storing your passwords on disk so that you have to trust their crypto. But there is also this ancient idea to derive individual passwords from a single master password via one-way hashing functions. This is great as the only sensitive piece of data is your master password, and this one you can hopefully just remember.

    Posted , Author

← Older Newer →