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  • Almost exactly a year ago I wrote a blog post explaining how permission prompts are a particularly problematic area for a functioning extension ecosystem. While at this point it was already clear that Firefox would show some kind of permission prompt, I hoped that Mozilla would put more thought into it than Chrome did. Unfortunately, this didn’t quite happen. In fact, as I now experienced, the permission prompt in Firefox turned out significantly worse than the one in Chrome.

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  • I’ve finally released Easy Passwords as a Web Extension (not yet through AMO review at the time of writing), so that it can continue working after Firefox 57. To be precise, this is an intermediate step, a hybrid extension meant to migrate data out of the Add-on SDK into the Web Extension part. But all the functionality is in the Web Extension part already, and the data migration part is tiny. Why did it take me so long? After all, Easy Passwords was created when Mozilla’s Web Extensions plan was already announced. So I was designing the extension with Web Extensions in mind, which is why it could be converted without any functionality changes now. Also, Easy Passwords has been available for Chrome for a while already.

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  • Emscripten allows compiling C++ code to JavaScript. It is an interesting approach allowing porting large applications (games) and libraries (crypto) to the web relatively easily. It also promises better performance and memory usage for some scenarios (something we are currently looking into for Adblock Plus core). These beneficial effects largely stem from the fact that the “memory” Emscripten-compiled applications work with is a large uniform typed array. The side-effect is that buffer overflows, use-after-free bugs and similar memory corruption mistakes are introduced to JavaScript that was previously safe from them. But are these really security-relevant?

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  • This announcement by the Princeton University is making its rounds in the media right now. What the media seems to be most interested in is their promise of ad blocking that websites cannot possibly detect, because the website can only access a fake copy of the page structures where all ads appear to be visible. The browser on the other hand would work with the real page structures where ads are hidden. This isn’t something the Princeton researchers implemented yet, but they could have, right?

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  • Six month ago I wrote a detailed analysis of LastPass security architecture. In particular, I wrote:

    So much for the general architecture, it has its weak spots but all in all it is pretty solid and your passwords are unlikely to be compromised at this level. However, as described in my blog post the browser integration turned out to be a massive weakness. The LastPass extension on your computer works with decrypted data, so it needs to be extra careful – and at the moment it isn’t.

    I went on to point out Auto Fill functionality and internal messaging as the main weak spots of the Last Pass browser extensions. And what do I read in the news today? Google reporter Tavis Ormandy found two security vulnerabilities in LastPass. In which areas? Well, Auto Fill and internal messaging of course.

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